Three Myths About the Book of Revelation Refuted

 

Important Differences Between True History and the Distortions of 'Conventional Wisdom'

by Mark E. Mountjoy

Introductory Remarks

Truthseekers, apologists, polemicists, historians, Bible teachers—all have a stake in the accurate exegesis, interpretation and transmission of the message of Jesus Christ as he gave it in the Book of Revelation. But after two thousand years of neglect or abuse, misinterpretation or gross interpolation, the time has now come when it is necessary to look at, not only key texts in the Book of Revelation, but also cherished assumptions and even presuppositions which may (in reality) stand against the quest to correctly grasp how what Jesus said was originally intended to be understood. Besides misunderstandings on the side of conventional Futurist wisdom, conventional Preterist wisdom also rests on questionable assumptions about what Jesus says and means.

All parties, therefore, have a large stake in what the outcome of a rigorous audit of premises and claims conclude and all parties stand to benefit in more ways than may at first meet the eye. The blessings of what is truthful will always trump the perceived advantages of what is merely a myth or falsehood. What is really true is best if for no other reason than that observers will at once be able to see clearly who Jesus really is and make decisive choices effecting salvation and eternal life based on the most sensible and coherent evidence available.

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A Fresh Look at 2 Thessalonians 2:1-12—Was the Apostasy an Absolute and Complete Rejection of the God of Israel? (Revised)

by Mark Mountjoy

Introductory Remarks

Christians from a wide variety of traditions and creedal backgrounds normally entertain predictable and popular ideas and concepts about the apostasy directly preceding the Second Coming described by Paul in 2 Thessalonians the second chapter. In the four great Christian traditions these can be summed up as being either a past Roman, Catholic or future European figure as "the man of sin." Rote tradition (rather than critical studies) govern interpretations and the Apostle Paul's prophecy of the coming of the Lord in 2 Thessalonians is one of the more familiar yet (at the very same time) obscure of these.

But today, in the light of ancient Judæan history, we want to take a fresh look at it to grapple with this question: Does it portend a person claiming to be the true God himself, or does it predict a complete apostasy away from the God of the Hebrew Old Testament?

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Baptism into Christ—According to the Bible

by Mark E. Mountjoy

Introduction

Rampant confusion exists in the Christian world concerning the intent, purpose and mode of water baptism. Is it sprinkling, pouring, or immersion? Is baptism for infants or for those at the age of accountability? Should baptism be performed in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit; or in the name of Jesus Christ'? The truth about baptism can be known only if men and women allow their conclusions to be defined according to the Bible.

Statement One:

According to the Bible, baptism into Christ was a command given by Christ after his resurrection.

"And Jesus came and spake unto them, saying, All power is given unto me in heaven and in earth. Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost: teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and, lo, I am with you always, even unto the end of the world. Amen" (Matthew 28:18-20).

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